The modern-looking pho restaurant is like an oasis at noontime Saturday on a quiet stretch of Divisadero. My Father’s Kitchen probably serves up a lot of health care workers on the weekdays, surrounded by a few hospitals north of Geary Boulevard, and on Saturdays it’s one of the few lunch options.

I discovered the little shop walking briskly along Divisadero, and the 3-year-old restaurant seems quite popular. With a friendly service staff, the restaurant is family owned and yes, the owner’s dad Henry Nguyen is in the kitchen cooking up food from his native Haiphong in North Vietnam.

I always love the color of Thai ice tea (che thai, $3), and My Father's Kitchen's version is full of body

I always love the color of Thai ice tea (che thai, $3), and My Father’s Kitchen’s version is full of body

The menu is shorter than what you’d find in other pho spots in other neighborhoods, and the prices are slightly higher. It’s a contemporary spot that can deliver some great basics like fresh spring rolls (goi cuon, $6.50) and beef pho ($7.50, small bowl), but other items take some getting used to.

For example, I didn’t expect the bun vermicelli bowl to be served with the noodles separated from the bowl and the pork and meatballs arriving almost in a bowl of soup. This is a dish I typically eat with the ingredients on top of the noodles with fresh herbs underneath. This presentation is a bit harder to eat, despite the flavor in the meat.

The Last Bite
Although you can get bigger portions at more rustic pho spots, My Father’s Kitchen is a sweet restaurant in a relatively quiet stretch of Divisadero. The pho is authentic but the other dishes might be more generic, lacking much sophistication. But maybe that’s the charm of this home-cooking inspired place.

Rating: 2 out of 4 camera snaps
2-snaps

 

My Father’s Kitchen, 1655 Divisadero St., San Francisco. PH: 415.829.2610. Open Monday to Saturday for lunch and dinner. No reservations, major credit cards accepted. myfatherskitchensf.com

My Father's Kitchen on Urbanspoon

Goi, or green papaya salad with shrimp, julienned pork, carrots, mint and roasted peanuts ($6.50) is quite filling, with extremely julienned green papaya.

Goi, or green papaya salad with shrimp, julienned pork, carrots, mint and roasted peanuts ($6.50) is quite filling, with extremely julienned green papaya.

Pho tai or beef rice noodle soup with rare eye of round steak ($7.50, small)

Pho tai or beef rice noodle soup with rare eye of round steak ($7.50, small)

But chat thit nuong or marinated grilled pork and meatballs served with fresh herbs, rice vermicelli and fish sauce ($11)

But chat thit nuong or marinated grilled pork and meatballs served with fresh herbs, rice vermicelli and fish sauce ($11)

My Father's Kitchen is a popular option on Saturdays on a quiet section of Divisadero

My Father’s Kitchen is a popular lunch option on Saturdays on a quiet section of Divisadero

4 Responses to Review of My Father’s Kitchen Restaurant in San Francisco

  1. Carolyn Jung says:

    What a charming place. And I love the name. I can never resist green papaya salad, especially in summer. So refreshing and enjoyable with all of its crunchy textures.

  2. Mai says:

    The bun cha is actually presented in the same way they would in Hanoi, and it looks authentic to me. The common presentation in America is, exactly as you said, to make it easier for Americans. The writing on the glass door is interesting, “pho phuong hong” means “pink delonix regia pho”, I wonder why he put it there…

    • Ben Ben says:

      Thanks Mai for the info. Makes sense that he presents the bun in Hanoi style since he’s from that area. I guess I’m not used to it, and for the record, still feel it’s harder to eat it presented that way.

      • Mai says:

        My guess is serving it that way keeps every bite fresh, so you don’t have a puddle of sauce at the bottom which makes the bun salty there and bland on top. But I agree, I like mixing everything together too. Except beansprouts, I hate having the fresh beansprouts in the bowl.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current day month ye@r *

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.