The story: The people behind the extremely popular dim sum tea house Koi Palace in Daly City has entered the heart of San Francisco with a new restaurant called Dragon Beaux in the Outer Richmond neighborhood. It serves dim sum during the day and turns into a gathering for hot pot dining at night.

Mod patterns of wall decor in the lounge-y dining room.

Mod patterns of wall decor in the lounge-y dining room.

Abalone tart ($8.88) is a custard tart topped with a small slice of abalone with a savory sauce.

Abalone tart ($8.88) is a custard tart topped with a small slice of abalone with a savory sauce.

Why I went: This review focuses on Dragon Beaux’s dim sum offerings. I tried to get a group of people to get dim sum on a recent Saturday, but it ended up just being myself and my good friend Jeanne. Because the restaurant is a bit smaller than most dim sum spots, we ended up sharing a table with a couple with two young children.

Goddess statue in the entrance in front of a colorful wall display made with a variety of grains.

Goddess statue in the entrance in front of a colorful wall display made with a variety of grains.

Mongolian beef rice crepe roll ($8.88) was spicy and the beef slices were chewy.

Mongolian beef rice crepe roll ($8.88) was spicy and the beef slices were chewy.

The vibe: The modern, high-end decor has a bit of a lounge vibe to it, from the dim lights to the somewhat loud music. There are still a few carts circulating the room and servers carrying trays with dim sum for sale, but much of the items are ordered from a menu sheet and turned over to the main servers.

Kurobuta pork puff ($8.88). You have to stuff the puffs yourself.

Kurobuta pork puff ($8.88). You have to stuff the puffs yourself.

A close-up look of my pork puff after stuffing it with the filling.

A close-up look of my pork puff after stuffing it with the filling.

The menu: The dim sum offerings are limited because Dragon Beaux tries to put creative spins to old classics, so I guess the kitchen tries to focus on these few items. Some examples of new spins to classics include dumplings with new fillings such as sea bass and squid ink, then custard tarts are topped with abalone, and rice rolls get new filling options such as Mongolian beef or bitter melon chicken rice.

Sea bass dumplings ($6.88)

Sea bass dumplings ($6.88)

Crab roe juicy xiao lung bao ($8.88). The filling had flavor and the soup inside was light, but wasn't a fan of the skin that seemed to be tough instead of delicate.

Crab roe juicy xiao lung bao ($8.88). The filling had flavor and the soup inside was light, but wasn’t a fan of the skin that seemed to be tough instead of delicate.

My favorite dish: I liked the sea bass dumplings ($6.88), which were both colorful in presentation and filled with juicy white fish inside. I also liked the flavorful filling in the Kurobuta pork puff ($8.88), although it was a bit messy to eat (you have to stuff your own puff shells with the minced pork).

Display of tea kettles and vases

Display of tea pots and cups

Abalone, chicken sticky rice in lotus leaf ($6.88), was tasty and cooked nicely but I don't think I noticed the abalone.

Abalone, chicken sticky rice in lotus leaf ($6.88), was tasty and cooked nicely but I don’t think I noticed the abalone.

The last bite: While not every item is a success (the crab roe xiao long bao had a dumping skin that was more like an egg-yolk type won ton skins than the delicate Shanghai soup dumplings) and the desserts seem a bit simple, most items had good flavor and the new twists made dim sum eating a bit more fun and interesting.

Nostalgic Malay sponge cake ($4.88), was one of my favorite things growing up, but this version had a darker molasses flavor than the lighter sponge cakes I grew up with.

Nostalgic Malay sponge cake ($4.88), was one of my favorite things growing up, but this version had a darker molasses flavor than the lighter sponge cakes I grew up with.

Egg custard roll ($4.88) looked pretty and had a light texture, but I wished there was more of a custard filling.

Egg custard roll ($4.88) looked pretty and had a light texture, but I wished there was more of a custard filling.

The rating: 2.5 out of 4 camera snaps
2.5snaps

 


The deets:
Dragon Beaux, 5700 Geary Blvd., San Francisco. PH: 415.333.8899. Open weekdays for dim sum, 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. (till 3 p.m. Friday); weekends 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; hot pot dinners daily from 5:30 to 10 p.m. (till 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday). Reservations accepted only for dinner. Major credit cards accepted. www.dragonbeaux.com

Dragon Beaux Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

One Response to A Review of Dim Sum at Dragon Beaux in San Francisco

  1. Carolyn Jung says:

    Wow, abalone custard tarts! I’m intrigued by all the creative offerings. And it’s fun that the prices all end in lucky “.88”