The butcher section of The Market.

The butcher section of The Market.

A lot is happening in the mid-Market area of San Francisco, long lost to the homeless and drug use from the encroaching Tenderloin. But when Twitter moved into a shiny new building known as Market Square, splashy luxury condos followed and now the first of many retail developments has arrived.

I’m talking specifically of The Market, a 22,000-square-foot food hall that’s a cross between San Francisco’s food mecca Ferry Building and a glorified Whole Foods. (In fact, the Market Square owners are working with the architectural firm, BCV, who were behind the revitalization of the Ferry Building.) Opened last week, The Market is anchored by a grocery store but surrounded by a Four Barrel cafe, sushi and oyster bar, tacos bar, tapas bar, and a slew of eateries serving up pizza, chocolates, wine, and juices.

And that’s just to start. In the next few weeks, more vendors will be taking up the spots around The Market, including a Blue Bottle cafe and Azalina’s Malaysian.

Yesterday I dropped by to check out the place, as did a steady flow of people who either lives in the neighborhood or wanted to explore the latest food scene. The shelves are stocked with many locally made products, and organic, sustainable, and fair trade signs are seen every where.

I had an early dinner at the sushi and oyster bar, which is right at the corner, getting a lot of light from Market Street. The oysters I tried (all were from Washington state) were incredibly fresh and briny, and a plate of kampachi ($17) was beautifully plated. I washed everything down with a very smooth junmai ginjo sake. And while everything was fresh, like many of the eateries at The Market the prices are high (oysters were $3 each), geared toward the Twitter and other techie crowd, I imagine.

While this is probably a welcomed project for this area of San Francisco, it pales in comparison to the Ferry Building. In many ways, it really felt like a big Twitter cafeteria and store to support the dining needs of the employees who work in the building.

The deets: The Market, 1355 Market St. (at 10th St.), San Francisco. Open daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (most eateries start serving around 11 a.m.).

The Market is at the corner of a building most people know as the Twitter building, but officially is called Market Square since other tenants are planning to move in.

The Market is at the corner of a building most people know as the Twitter building, but officially is called Market Square since other tenants are planning to move in.

Lots of local brands are featured

Lots of local brands are featured

A cheese stand and wine shop are in the back, along with the tapas bar, juice bar and pizza stand.

A cheese stand and wine shop are in the back, along with the tapas bar, juice bar and pizza stand.

Putting a freshly-made pizza into the oven

Putting a freshly-made pizza into the oven

Some new names include Nuubia, an artisan chocolatier

Some new names include Nuubia, an artisan chocolatier

Shucking fresh oysters at the Sushi and Oyster Bar.

Shucking fresh oysters at the Sushi and Oyster Bar.

I tried half a dozen oysters, including miyagi, kuushi, and shigoku. I especially liked the shigoku. They were simply dressed with a spicy red chili paste mixed with yuzu.

I tried half a dozen oysters, including miyagi, kuushi, and shigoku. I especially liked the shigoku. They were simply dressed with a spicy red chili paste mixed with yuzu.

The sushi bar

The sushi bar

This lovely junmai ginjo sake ($11) had a hint of sweet melon that was almost like drinking Sauvignon Blanc.

This lovely junmai ginjo sake ($11) had a hint of sweet melon that was almost like drinking Sauvignon Blanc.

Kanpachi ceviche ($17) made with serrano pepper, ikura, apple slices and micro celery.

Kanpachi ceviche ($17) made with serrano pepper, ikura, apple slices and micro celery.

One Response to First Look at The Market in Market Square aka the Twitter Building

  1. Carolyn Jung says:

    It’s amazing all the new developments that have come about because of the growth surge in the tech industry. It’s nice to see this long-forlorn part of Market Street get a facelift. Can’t wait to check it out more.